Happy Hacking Keyboard Pro 2

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Happy Hacking Keyboard Pro 2 - The HHKB Pro 2 is a legendary 60% compact mechanical keyboard with a unique key layout, PBT keycaps, minimalistic Japanese design, premium build quality and don't forget the venerable Topre switches that provide a heavenly typing experience.

Best Wireless Mechanical Keyboards

Top 5 Wireless Mechanical Keyboards (2018)

When I started writing this post I wanted the list to be a lot longer. I quickly discovered the market for wireless mechanical keyboards is akin to a barren wasteland. There seems to be a demand, but the supply just isn’t there yet. Wired mechanical keyboards are somewhat of a small niche themselves and enthusiasts willing to pay the premium to own one are almost always looking for the best performance possible, which admittedly isn’t usually offered via wireless solutions. This is especially true for PC gamers who require low latency and no input lag.

Honestly, I don’t even own one myself yet, though I hope to remedy that in the near future (Update: Review added for the Anne Pro). Still, more choices for a good wireless mechanical keyboard is something I think many in the mechanical keyboard community would welcome with open arms. Since I’m currently on the hunt for one of my own I thought I would share what I’ve learned from my research. Let’s take a look at five of the best currently available wireless mechanical keyboards and see if we can find a viable board or two that will please casuals and enthusiasts alike. Continue reading

65% mechanical keyboard with wireless connectivity (Bluetooth 4.0) and Cherry MX switches.

$100 Keywalker 65% Bluetooth Mechanical Keyboard On Massdrop

Today Massdrop added a listing for a 65% wireless (Bluetooth 4.0) mechanical keyboard from a brand called Keywalker. The keyboard has 68 keys in a compact form factor similar to the TADA68. It includes dedicated arrow keys while only being one column wider than a typical 60% form factor mechanical keyboard. The switches are Cherry MX in either tactile (brown), clicky (blue), or linear (red/back) variants. Continue reading

Vortex Core 40% Mechanical Keyboard Review

Vortex Core 40% Mechanical Keyboard Now Available from Amazon

Vortex’s next “big” product comes in a tiny package. The Vortex Core 40% mechanical keyboard was just recently made available to order from Amazon (sold by Corus but fulfilled by Amazon).

The Core is a ultra-compact mechanical keyboard with only 47 dedicated keys. It uses multiple function layers and programmability to provide functionality similar to that of larger keyboards, but with a much smaller footprint for improved ergonomics and space-saving ability. Continue reading

Cherry MX Red LED Switches

Common Mechanical Keyboard Switch Types

There are numerous types of mechanical keyboard switches and even more manufacturers producing them. Cheap membrane based rubber dome keyboards may still be the most prevalent, but mechanical keyboards have become extremely popular among gamers and computer enthusiasts over the last decade. Many new companies have been created with the sole goal of filling the gap in mechanical keyswitches. However, one brand was here from the beginning and still stands above the rest. Let’s learn a little about Cherry and their legendary keyswitches. Continue reading

Pros and Ccons of Mechanical Keyboards

Advantages Of Mechanical Keyboards

A mechanical keyboard makes use of a physical switch under every individual keycap in order to process input as the user actuates a key. As you press down a key the switch soldered to the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) underneath is activated. This registers the key press. The keyboard PCB then sends a signal to the computer telling it a specific key was pressed.  This is what a mechanical keyboard is and how it works in very basic terms. But let’s look a little deeper and find out what makes the best mechanical keyboard, the primary advantages they provide over other keyboard types and why you should go mechanical if you haven’t already.

What are mechanical keyboards?

Unlike many keyboards that uses a rubber dome with a single membrane for all keys that makes contact to form an electrical circuit, mechanical keyboards use an actual switch under each key and a spring mechanism for actuating and returning the key to its original position. Continue reading