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DREVO Calibur - The Calibur is one of the most affordable wireless mechanical keyboards on the market. It's a compact form factor (65%) keyboard with wireless connectivity (Bluetooth 4.0), PBT keycaps, RGB backlighting, floating key design and Outemu MX style switches.

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Buckling Spring: The Origin of Mechanical Keyboards

Buckling spring mechanism being actuated.Click to enlarge and see animated, Source: Wikipedia

The buckling spring keyboard was invented by Richard Hunter Harris and later patented in 1977 by IBM. Its name actually derives from how the physical mechanism works when actuating a key, with a spring being put under pressure and “buckling” between the keycap and a pivoting hammer, creating a distinct mechanical auditory feedback.

The buckling spring switch design has undergone several revisions to reach its current form. Initially, it was hard to predict the direction the spring would bend in as it’s attached to the key at only two points of contact. If the spring were to bend in the wrong direction no contact would be made and the circuit wouldn’t complete. Continue reading

Matias switches, modern ALPS-type clone.

Matias/ALPS Switches Explored and Explained

Although original ALPS switches are no longer manufactured, the clone ALPS created by Matias stay true to the originals. What makes ALPS so different is their tactile feeling and the distinct “click” sound that they make. This is especially true for the ALPS spring switch.

They were first introduced in 1983 and today Matias offers three versions of ALPS-type switches. They are the quiet click, click, and quiet linear switches. Each has its own benefits and specific uses. Continue reading

Rosewill RK-9000V2 BR Review

Rosewill RK-9000V2 BR Review: No-frills Mechanical Keyboard

Hardcore PC gamers take their keyboard seriously. When milliseconds are the difference between winning and losing a responsive mech can give you that slight edge over your opponent. For years the original RK-9000 was the benchmark for Rosewill mechanical gaming keyboards. That said, the previous version had it’s flaws; primarily a mini USB port that was prone to failure if presented with too much pressure from external forces. Fixing that problem while implementing a few other small changes was Rosewill’s goal with the updated version, model RK-9000V2. Continue reading

Replace Keycaps

Keycap Replacement: Facts You Should Know

Custom keycaps and aftermarket key sets are a fun and easy way to customize your keyboard. Most mechanical keyboards have keycaps that can be removed with a simple keycap puller tool. But Why would you want to replace your keycaps anyway? Lots of reasons.

Eventually keycaps made of cheaper materials will begin to wear out. This usually involves yellowing, losing their texture and having the legends fade or even completely disappear. Mechanical keyboards are generally very sturdy, but the keycaps will endure heavy abuse over the years. Just because the keycaps have outlived their effectiveness doesn’t mean the keyboard is ruined. Continue reading

Cherry MX Red LED Switches

Common Mechanical Keyboard Switch Types

There are numerous types of mechanical keyboard switches and even more manufacturers producing them. Cheap membrane based rubber dome keyboards may still be the most prevalent, but mechanical keyboards have become extremely popular among gamers and computer enthusiasts over the last decade. Many new companies have been created with the sole goal of filling the gap in mechanical keyswitches. However, one brand was here from the beginning and still stands above the rest. Let’s learn a little about Cherry and their legendary keyswitches. Continue reading

Patriot Viper V760 Review

Patriot Viper V760 Review: RGB Backlit Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

Are you planning to buy a mechanical keyboard for your daily gaming action? Interested to know more about the full size Patriot Viper V760 mechanical gaming keyboard with RGB backlighting? If so you’ve come to the right place. The following in-depth review of the Viper V760 will give you an idea of its gaming focused features and help you decide if it’s a good fit for your gaming or typing needs. Continue reading

Pros and Ccons of Mechanical Keyboards

Advantages Of Mechanical Keyboards

A mechanical keyboard makes use of a physical switch under every individual keycap in order to process input as the user actuates a key. As you press down a key the switch soldered to the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) underneath is activated. This registers the key press. The keyboard PCB then sends a signal to the computer telling it a specific key was pressed.  This is what a mechanical keyboard is and how it works in very basic terms. But let’s look a little deeper and find out what makes the best mechanical keyboard, the primary advantages they provide over other keyboard types and why you should go mechanical if you haven’t already.

What are mechanical keyboards?

Unlike many keyboards that uses a rubber dome with a single membrane for all keys that makes contact to form an electrical circuit, mechanical keyboards use an actual switch under each key and a spring mechanism for actuating and returning the key to its original position. Continue reading

The History of Mechanical Keyboards

Typing technology has come a long way since its inception in the 1700s. Manufacturing of actual typing devices took many more years and the first generation of these devices was introduced in 1870s. Since then such devices have undergone continual evolution through minor and major updates alike.

Mechanical keyboards of today are much more refined, thus capable of typing characters far more quickly and efficiently with greater accuracy. The improvements that have been developed in technology, design and layout lead to availability of present day mechanical keyboards. What steps have been taken to perfect this integral input device that the daily lives and jobs of literally millions of people revolve around? Read on to discover the history behind the evolution of modern mechanical keyboards. Continue reading